We found that differences in both directions (i.e., supervisors considered themselves higher than suppliers or superiors considered themselves inferior to suppliers) were related to a more negative organizational culture. Therefore, helping leaders develop perceptions of themselves that are more consistent with the perceptions of supporters of the Leader can help mitigate the negative effects of these perception differences on corporate culture. Consistent with our anecdotal experiences and reports of supervisors of mental health programs, supervisors often move from providing clinical services to monitoring services and other providers, while receiving very little training in supervision, management and management (Aarons et al. 2015). When management training is provided, it often focuses on day-to-day issues such as time management, billing requirements, and proper documentation for service contracts or insurance reimbursements. There is little or no training in effective management, or in assessing and developing one`s own knowledge of leadership, skills and competencies. First, surface tests were studied to assess the relationship between congruence/incongruity between supervisors` assessments and transformational management supplier assessments and the hierarchical superior`s consensual culture. The results suggest that the concordance between supervisors and suppliers did not influence the consensus (a1 = − 0.13, t = − 1.071, p = 0.291). However, the incongruity between line managers and supplier evaluations in transformative management was significantly twisted relative to consensus (a4 = 1.18, t = 3.281, p = 0.002), so that evaluations of a culture of consensus increased as evaluations between superiors and suppliers increased. Another analysis showed that the direction of the gap between supervisor and transformative leadership provider assessments had a significant impact on consensus culture (a3 = 0.51, t = 2.741, p = 0.010).

Consistent with our third hypothesis, the culture of consensus was greater when assessments of transformative leadership providers were low and superior self-assessments for transformative leadership were high than when feedback from transformative leadership providers was high, combined with low self-assessments of supervisors for transformative leadership. It is important to keep in mind that superiors/leaders often react emotionally and with difficulty when their self-assessments are very much over from leadership, especially when their own assessments are more positive than their supplier/prudential assessments. This raises the question of how superiors react to divergent negative reactions. Attribution distortions can affect the extent to which superiors experience stress or emotional stress related to negative reactions. . . .

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